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Aunt Kathy was asking what the purple tree was. Well, a friend who has just returned from Australia was helpful enough to let me know the name (thanks Jen!)

It’s called the Jacaranda Tree.

In Newtown, Sydney

In Newtown, Sydney

Photo by: schizophonia

My friend Bill went ahead and found out some interesting information on the trees from Wikipedia:

The city of Brisbane in Australia has a local reputation of having a significant population of Jacaranda trees. The University of Queensland in the city’s inner west has a very high concentration of the tree, and due to the impressive display of purple flowers in mid-Spring, which wind up littering vast sections of the suburbs, local folklore claims that “one won’t start studying for exams until the jacarandas have molted”. At Sydney University there exists a similar expression “by the time the jacaranda in the main quadrangle flowers, it’s too late to start studying for exams”.

This has led to the slang name “exam tree” being attached to the plant. At the University of Queensland students even maintain a joke superstition that if a Jacaranda bloom falls on their head during exam time, they will fail an exam. The bad luck can be broken by catching another bloom before it hits the ground.

The reason for the Jacaranda’s proliferation in Brisbane is often attributed to the thirties and forties, when new mothers leaving the maternity hospital were given a jacaranda sapling to plant.

Jacarandas in bloom have become closely associated with Brisbane and South East Queensland. The Brisbane City Council have used jacarandas to line avenues, and commercial developments in some areas, particularly along the Brisbane River have incorporated jacarandas into their landscape design. The trees are common in parks throughout the city, most notably in a long curved avenue in the inner city New Farm Park, in Goodna, and in private gardens. Brisbane’s hilly geography allows views of the city and suburbs in which the brightly coloured flowers can be easily seen for miles.

The jacaranda has become so much a part of the city’s identity that contemporary art, particularly of streetscapes, often incorporates the flowering jacaranda, despite the fact that it only flowers for approximately six weeks from September through October.

The city of Grafton on the north coast of New South Wales, Australia, is also famous for its Jacarandas. Every October the city has a Jacaranda festival during the period of full bloom. A street parade, local public holiday and a series of events are held. A local public holiday sees the city’s businesses perform street theatre for passers by and street stalls proliferate. A Jacaranda Queen and Jacaranda Princess are named at a formal ball.

Source.

So there you have it!

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